Touring Caravan and Holiday Home Parks

Local Attractions

With a population of only 10,000, Ludlow certainly has a lot more to offer than its size would suggest. The town is an architectural gem with over 500 listed buildings and a well-deserved reputation for quality food and drink. You’ll find a selection of small, family-owned businesses; butchers, bakers, delicatessens and food shops that sell quality products with a personal touch.

Ludlow Castle is at the heart of this fine medieval market town; winner of the Best Town in England 2007. Once the home of Kings, Ludlow Castle has dominated life in Ludlow for centuries and has been described as "the epitome of what a castle ought to be". It still plays a vital role today and acts as a venue for festivals, events and open air theatre.

The Ludlow Marches Food & Drink Festival is held every September and Ludlow Festival is held in June/ July attracting performers from all over the world. In November the Medieval Christmas Fair is held locally.        

Ludlow is situated in The Shropshire Hills Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty (AONB), a special landscape rich in heritage and wildlife. Off the beaten track, it is loved for its tranquillity and inspiration as well as its walking and numerous outdoor activities. Stand on one of the many hilltops and admire the view or explore the woods, valleys and rural villages below where you can relish in the vibrant country markets, quirky events and charming country pubs.

Ludlow Castle

The Castle, firstly a Norman Fortress, is one of finest of medieval ruins. It has been extended over the centuries to become a fortified Royal Palace and has ensured Ludlow's place in English history.

The Castle hosts a Shop, Gallery and Art Room and a Tea Room Courtyard. Dogs are allowed in the Castle and Tea Room as long as they remain on the lead.

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Ludlow Castle

Ludlow Food Festival 2016

The Ludlow Food Centre is a unique food shopping experience where farming, food production and retailing infuse together to create a very special environment.

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Dine at Fishmore Hall's award-winning restaurant

Fishmore Hall is a privately-owned boutique country house hotel set on a hill overlooking Ludlow.

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Fishmore Hall Ludlow

Take a tour round Stokesay Court

Stokesay is based in Craven Arms, a short drive from the site and was the setting for the mansion scenes in the film version of Ian McEwan's best selling novel, “Atonement”

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Stokesay Court

Acton Scott Historic Working Farm

Tucked away in the Shropshire Hills Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty, is the ancient Acton Scott estate.

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Acton Scott Working Farm

The Ironbridge Gorge Museums

Centred in the birthplace of the Industrial Revolution is acclaimed as one of the classical historical and archaeological centres of the world. The multi-site museum includes the Blists Hill Living Museum - well worth a visit for a taste of old Victorian England.

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Bridgnorth

Bridgnorth, in reality, is two towns: the High Town (good views down) and the Low Town (good views up). Now connected by the steepest inland funicular railway in Britain.

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Bridgnorth

Ludlow Racecourse

Tradition has it that in the fourteenth century soldiers from Ludlow Castle came here to match their horses.

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Ludlow Racecourse

Shropshire Hills Discovery Centre

Step back into the Iron Age and get up close to a real sized mammoth. Take a stroll in the 30 acres of meadow or relax in the cafe with a Shropshire cream tea. You can even take a balloon ride over the Shropshire Hills without leaving the ground.

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Shropshire Hills Discovery Centre

Church Stretton - Carding Mill Valley

Carding Mill Valley and the Long Mynd are part of the Shropshire Hills Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty and a Site of Special Scientific Interest. They offer breath-taking views across Shropshire, Cheshire and the Black Mountains. Due to the Mynd’s dominance of the landscape, it’s one of the reasons why Church Stretton is often referred to as Little Switzerland. For those not so keen on walking- you can drive to the top of the hill to take in the views.

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Carding Mill Valley

Clee Hill

The Clee Hills consist of Brown Clee Hill 1,772 feet (540 m), the highest peak in Shropshire, and Titterstone Clee Hill 1,749 feet (533 m). They are both in the Shropshire Hills Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty.

Views from the west of the hills spread as far as Snowdonia. To the south are the Malvern Hills and the Cotswolds, and to the east are the spread of the West Midlands. To the north is Cannock Chase, and on a very clear day the hills of the Peak District.

Clee Hill

Ludlow Food Centre & Conservatory Barn Cafe

A farm shop like no other, the Ludlow Food Centre is situated on the fringes of the Earl of Plymouth Estate (located on the A49, two miles north of Ludlow).

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Caer Caradoc

Hillfort reputed to be the site of Caractacus' last stand.

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Caer Caradoc